Memory of Mom: The Cheerleader in My Corner

Written by on May 12, 2012

Ann Morgan James and her mother riding a tandem bike when her mother was in her late 70s.

Ann Morgan James, author of  “How to Raise a Millionaire: Six Millionaire Skills You Can Teach Your Kids So They Can Imagine and Live the Life of Their Dreams,” shared this story about good times with her mother. 

Thanks, Ann!

First thing I would do is pull out the Scrabble board.

Even if we didn’t finish the game, playing a hand or two would be so very special!

Second, I would hold her every second. . .look in her eyes and see her knowing smile and unconditional love which was always there.

Third, I would tell her all my dreams and goals I am trying to accomplish.

I won’t weigh down the conversation by hashing over stuff that has happened since she was gone.

I would simply spend ever second soaking up all her positive energy and unflagging belief in me, so I could have it when she was gone again.

One of the hardest things about not having my Mom around has been keeping my chin up without my cheerleader in my corner.

Going through a divorce, reinventing myself at age 50, and dealing with life’s blows has been hard at times.

It’s those times–when I need someone to have my back and I don’t–that miss her the most.

It’s those times when I pull on the internal strength she planted in me so I can believe in myself and make my own way.

These are the gifts I am planting in my son.

Memory of Mom: Your Blue-Striped Apron

Written by Charlene Morella on May 11, 2012

Charlene Morella displays photos of her mother and the blue apron mentioned in her story, below.

This is Charlene Morella’s Mother’s Day Tribute to her Mom, who passed away May 6, 2002, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s Disease. Thanks for such a moving entry, Charlene!

Dear Mom,

I hope you know how much I love and miss you everyday.

When I think about you, I picture your beautiful white hair and smiling face.

I can still feel the touch of your soft hands when you touched mine, and how you gently patted my check and still called me “baby,” even as I approached my 60th birthday.

There has not been a moment in my life when I didn’t feel nurtured by your unconditional love and acceptance.

The vision that most often comes to mind is seeing you in our kitchen wearing the blue-striped apron that I gave you many years ago for Mother’s Day.

This room was the hub of your existence.

My most vivid memories are the image of you in your apron, taking a tissue from its pocket to dry my tears, or of you dispensing one of your early-morning hugs as I groggily joined you for breakfast before school, or of us sitting down together at the kitchen table for a mother-daughter talk.

The striped apron now hangs on the back of my laundry-room door.

It’s faded and has obtained a gentle softness from its countless washings.

I don’t have a wardrobe of aprons as you did. I don’t need them. I have your apron.

There are many things in my home that once graced your home. But none evoke such deep emotion in me as that blue-striped fabric hanging in my laundry room.

It is a symbol of all the good parts of my life growing up, and the woman that made it so.

You, my Mother, were my beloved role model and the very first love of my life.

So tonight as I go to prepare dinner, first, I’ll wear my apron in a silent tribute to you.

We will be eternally bound together by its tattered apron strings.

Memory of Mom: You Are My Hero!

Written by Lynn Banis on May 8, 2012

Lynn Banis and her mother

This Memory of Mom (MoM) comes from Lynn Banis, who works as a life coach in Illinois. She told me, “Memories of my Mom mean everything to me. I would love to have others know a little of her incredible self.”

Thank you for sending your story, Lynn!

What can I say to you that has not been said, felt, cried about, clung to? I can only say again and again how much I love you.

You gave us–Rich, Bruce and me–a safe but challenging place to live and grow.

You encouraged us to pursue education and become our own persons.

You were always there with practical wisdom to help us on our way.

Your steadfast encouragement lifted us up and kept us going when the going got rough. And it did get rough.

We always knew you were there, though.

I have to laugh about the time you recognized I was not comfortable standing my own ground with my high-school peers. You said to tell them your mom wouldn’t let you–you were happy to be the scapegoat until I could grow into my own sense of self.

I have to admit, it worked so well for me I said it to my teens, too, if they needed it!

I want you to know how proud I am to be your daughter.

You were so active, inquisitive, and courageous during your youth. Who would dive off the 25-foot tower into the Lagoon at the Chicago World’s Fair but you?

You did some amazing things when you were young, and really made a name for yourself yet you never flaunted that.

Through your actions you taught us to be humble and not to expect the world to hand us anything.

We knew we had to work, and work hard to get where we wanted to be.

You are my hero. I don’t know anything that is better than that!

Memory of Mom: How Will I Live Without You?

Written by Mary Sullivan on May 6, 2012

Mary Sullivan and her 10-year-old daughter write books together. They have two titles already published–“If I Had a Daddy” and “If We Were Best Friends”and two more are being written. 

Of her mother, Mary said, “I miss her every day and talk to her everyday!”

My mom has passed, but if I had five more minutes with her…after telling her I loved her my whole life, I would ask her how am I going to live without you?

Who will be there for me, like you were?

And I would ask her, if she could please watch over me until we meet again!

Memory of Mom: Thoughts and Even a Video!

Written by Joy Ware Miller on May 5, 2012

This Memory of Mom comes from Joy Ware Miller, who also submitted our first-ever Memory of Mom video! Thanks for both your submissions, Joy!

I grew up with such a rich heritage. I was in my early twenties and all my grandparents and parents were still with us!

The life and God lessons they taught and lived are what truly continue to inspire me today!

In turn…I now can attempt to live the legacy with my children…because we never know, when we will only have Five More Minutes! Thanks for allowing us to share!

P.S. I created a “Proverbs 31 in Modern Day” video on YouTube! I would be delighted if you choose to share it….and I believe others blessed!

Blessings,

Joy

  • Dreaming as the Summers Die

    I looked up sharply. Jean was my “real” mother, and I hadn˙t seen her for years. I wanted to ask if she had seen “Easter Parade,” my new favorite movie. I wanted to ask where she lived, if she traveled, if she liked to play Parcheesi or Tripoley. I wanted to ask if she remembered when I was born.

    Keep reading Dreaming as the Summers Die...